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Education & Training

Education & Training

This page includes resources for workplaces in the Education and Training industry on work health and safety, workers’ compensation and COVID-19. We also have information for  Early Childhood Education.


The Education and Training industry provides education and training services to people of all ages. Services are delivered by teachers or instructors who explain, tell or demonstrate a wide variety of subjects.


Education may be provided in a range of settings, such as schools, colleges, and universities. Generally, instruction is delivered through face-to-face interaction between teachers and students, although other means and mediums of delivery, such as by correspondence, radio, television or the internet, may be used.

To ensure this information is as accessible and easy to understand as possible, we refer to ‘employers’ and their responsibilities. However, both provincial and state OHS legislation, duties apply to any person conducting a business which includes employers, but also others who engage workers.

OHS Duties
Workers' Rights
Consultation
Risk Assessment
Vulnerable Workers
Emergency Plans
COVID @ Work
Health Monitoring
Physical Distancing
Hygiene
Cleaning
PPE
Masks
Gloves
Mental Health
Violence @ Work
Working from Home

Duties Under OHS Legislation

There are current public health directions restricting business operations in some jurisdictions both in Canada and the United States. If you want to know what restrictions on business operations apply to your workplace, go to your relevant provincial or state government website. Businesses must only operate to the extent permissible in each province or state. The information provided below outlines measures which cover all aspects of services offered by the industry – depending on what is permissible in your jurisdiction, some sections may not be currently relevant to your business. 

 

If you want to know how OHS legislation apply to you or need help with what to do at your workplace, contact us on 1 866 337 4734 or through our online contact form.

OHS legislation requires you to take care of the health, safety and welfare of your workers, including yourself and other staff, contractors and volunteers, and others (clients, customers, visitors) at your workplace. This includes:


  • providing and maintaining a work environment that is without risk to health and safety

  • providing adequate and accessible facilities for the welfare of workers to carry out their work, and

  • monitoring the health of workers and the conditions of the workplace for the purpose of preventing illness or injury


Duty to workers


You must do what you can to ensure the health and safety of your workers. You must eliminate the risk of exposure to COVID-19 if reasonably practicable. If you are not able to eliminate the risk of exposure to COVID-19, you must minimise that risk, as far as is reasonably practicable. Protect workers from the risk of exposure to COVID-19 by, for example:


  • considering working from home arrangements

  • requiring workers to practice physical distancing

  • requiring workers to practice good hygiene (e.g., through workplace policies and ensuring access to adequate and well stocked hygiene facilities)

  • requiring workers to stay home when sick, and

  • cleaning the workplace regularly and thoroughly


Duty to other people in the workplace


You must ensure the work of your business does not put the health and safety of other persons (such as customers, clients and visitors) at risk of contracting COVID-19. Protect others from the risk of exposure to COVID-19 by, for example:


  • requiring them to practice physical distancing, including through contactless deliveries and payments

  • requiring them to practice good hygiene, and

  • requiring others to stay away from the workplace, unless essential (such as family, friends and visitors)


Duty to maintain the workplace and facilities


You must maintain your workplace to ensure the work environment does not put workers and others at risk of contracting COVID-19. Maintain a safe work environment by, for example:


  • cleaning the workplace regularly and thoroughly

  • restructuring the layout of the workplace to allow for physical distancing, and

  • limiting the number of people in the workplace at any given time


You must also provide adequate facilities in your workplace to protect your workers from contracting COVID-19. Facilities that are required include:


  • washroom facilities including adequate supply of soap, water and paper towel

  • hand sanitiser, where it is not possible for workers to wash their hands, and

  • staff rooms that are regularly cleaned and allow for physical distancing


Provide workers with regular breaks to use these facilities, particularly to allow workers to wash their hands.


Duty to provide information, training, instruction and supervision


You must provide your workers with any information or training that is necessary to protect them from the risk of exposure to COVID-19 arising from their work. Information and training may include:


  • providing guidance on how to properly wash hands

  • training workers in how to fit and use any necessary personal protective equipment (PPE)

  • training workers to exercise adequate cleaning practices throughout the day

  • providing workers with instructions on how to set up a safe home workplace, and

  • providing workers with instructions on staying home from work if sick


Duty to consult


You must consult with workers on health and safety matters relating to COVID-19. When consulting, you must give workers the opportunity to express their views and raise OHS concerns. You must take the views of workers into account and advise workers of the outcome of consultation.


Consult with workers:


  • when you conduct a risk assessment

  • when you make decisions on control measures to use to manage the risk of exposure to COVID-19 (e.g. decisions on working from home arrangements, or restricting the workplace to allow for physical distancing)

  • when you make decisions about the adequacy of the workplace facilities to allow for control measures such as physical distancing and hygiene

  • when you propose other changes that may affect the health and safety of workers, and

  • when you change any procedures that have an impact on the OHS of workers


If you and the workers have agreed to procedures for consultation, consultation must be in accordance with those procedures. You must allow workers to express their views and raise OHS issues that may arise directly or indirectly because of COVID-19. You must take the views of workers into account when making decisions and advise workers of your decision.


Workers are most likely to know about the risks of their work. Involving them will help build commitment to your processes and any changes you implement. Consultation does not require consensus or agreement but you must allow your workers to be part of the decision making process. If workers are represented by health and safety representatives you must include them in the consultation process.


Resources and support


For more information on how we can help, select CONTACT US below or call toll free on 866 337 4734 to arrange an appointment with one of our experienced team members today.


Hygiene

There are current public health directions restricting business operations in some jurisdictions both in Canada and the United States. If you want to know what restrictions on business operations apply to your workplace, go to your relevant provincial or state government website. Businesses must only operate to the extent permissible in each province or state. The information provided below outlines measures which cover all aspects of services offered by the industry – depending on what is permissible in your jurisdiction, some sections may not be currently relevant to your business. 

 

If you want to know how OHS legislation apply to you or need help with what to do at your workplace, contact us on 1 866 337 4734 or through our online contact form.

Worker, student and visitor hygiene


You must direct your workers, students and visitors to the premises to practice good hygiene while on premises. Good hygiene requires everyone to wash their hands regularly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and dry them with clean paper towel. Everyone must wash their hands:


  • before and after eating

  • after coughing or sneezing

  • after going to the toilet, and

  • when changing tasks and after touching potentially contaminated surfaces.


An alcohol-based hand sanitiser with at least 60% ethanol or 70% isopropanol as the active ingredient must be used as per the manufacturer’s instructions when it is not possible to wash hands. Good hygiene also requires everyone at the workplace to, at all times:


  • cover their coughs and sneezes with their elbow or a clean tissue (and no spitting)

  • avoid touching their face, eyes, nose and mouth

  • dispose of tissues and cigarette butts hygienically, e.g. in closed bins

  • wash their hands before and after smoking a cigarette

  • wash their hands before and after and training sessions

  • clean and disinfect shared equipment and plant after use

  • wash body, hair (including facial hair) and clothes thoroughly every day

  • have no intentional physical contact, for example, shaking hands and patting backs.


To enhance good hygiene outcomes:


  • develop infection control policies in consultation with your workers. These policies should outline measures in place to prevent the spread of infectious diseases at the workplace. Communicate these policies to workers

  • train workers on the importance of washing their hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and drying them correctly, or using an alcohol-based hand sanitiser, before entering and exiting a common area

  • place posters near handwashing facilities showing how to correctly wash and dry hands and clean hands with sanitiser, and

  • inform workers and students of workplace hygiene standards that are expected when utilising common areas (cleaning up after yourself, placing rubbish in bins provided, avoiding putting items such as phones on meal surfaces, etc.) and when sharing equipment in tutorials, workshops or laboratories (e.g. cleaning microscopes after use, washing hands before and after touching items)

  • provide alcohol-based hand sanitiser in appropriate locations for workers and students to use, such as at the entry and exit points of buildings, lecture theatres, libraries, computer labs, other common areas and accommodation facilities.

  • if premises health services are provided for workers and students, follow infection prevention and control measures for COVID-19 as advised by provincial or state health authorities

  • inform workers and students with signs throughout the premises, and notices by email or on your website/social media, of hygiene standards that are expected of people attending the premises. 


This may include:


  • washing hands or using alcohol-based hand sanitiser regularly and not touching your face

  • minimising the number of items they bring to the premises and times they touch their phone and other personal items as they could unintentionally transfer germs

  • staying at home if they feel unwell or directed by health authorities to self-quarantine or self-isolate.


Good hygiene measures should also be supported by increased cleaning measures - see also our information on cleaning. You should put processes in place to regularly monitor and review the implementation of hygiene measures to ensure they are being followed and remain effective.


Resources and support


For more information on how we can help, select CONTACT US below or call toll free on 866 337 4734 to arrange an appointment with one of our experienced team members today.

Physical Distancing

There are current public health directions restricting business operations in some jurisdictions both in Canada and the United States. If you want to know what restrictions on business operations apply to your workplace, go to your relevant provincial or state government website. Businesses must only operate to the extent permissible in each province or state. The information provided below outlines measures which cover all aspects of services offered by the industry – depending on what is permissible in your jurisdiction, some sections may not be currently relevant to your business. 

 

If you want to know how OHS legislation apply to you or need help with what to do at your workplace, contact us on 1 866 337 4734 or through our online contact form.

What is physical distancing and how does it prevent the spread of COVID-19?


Physical distancing (also referred to as ‘social distancing’) refers to the requirement that people distance themselves from others. COVID-19 spreads from person to person through contact with droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The droplets may fall directly into the person’s eyes, nose or mouth if they are in close contact with the infected person. A person may also be infected if they touch a surface contaminated with the droplets and then touch their mouth, nose or eyes before washing their hands.


Current health advice states that in order to reduce the risk of contact and droplet spread from a person, directly or indirectly, and from contaminated surfaces, people should maintain physical distance of at least 2 metres, practice good hand hygiene and engage in routine cleaning and disinfection of surfaces.


Physical distancing can also include requirements for there to be 4 square metres of space per person in a room or enclosed space, as well as limits on gathering sizes. These requirements differ between industries and between provinces and states. For example, some provinces and states have updated public health directions to adjust physical distancing rules in line with local circumstances, such as revising the one person per 4 square metres rule to one person per 2 square metres in some circumstances. For more information about physical distancing requirements applicable to your business, go to your relevant provincial or state government website.


Do I need to implement physical distancing measures in my workplace?


Yes. It is your duty under work health and safety laws to manage the risk of a person in your workplace spreading and contracting COVID-19, including the risk that persons with COVID-19 enter the workplace. Physical distancing is one of the key ways to lower the risk of COVID-19 being spread or contracted at your workplace.


The risk of COVID-19 should be treated in the same way as any other workplace hazard – by applying a risk management approach. In consultation with your workers, including volunteers, and their representatives (e.g. health and safety representatives (HSRs)), you will need to assess the likelihood and degree of harm people may experience if exposed to COVID-19 and then implement the most effective control measures that are reasonably practicable to manage the risk. The control measures you implement should include outcomes that support physical distancing and operate alongside measures encouraging good hygiene amongst workers and others as well as regular and thorough cleaning of the workplace.


To meet your OHS duty you should be continually monitoring and reviewing the risks to the health and safety of workers and others, as well as the effectiveness of control measures put in place to eliminate or minimise these risks. You must also assess any new or changed risks arising from COVID-19, for example customer aggression, high work demand or working in isolation. You may also need to comply with physical distancing measures issued under public health directions in your province or state. Each province and state has directions that reflect local circumstances. For more information about physical distancing requirements, go to your relevant provincial or state government website.


How do the public health directions in my province or state interact with my OHS duty?


You must comply with your province or state’s public health directions that apply to your business. Your OHS duty is to do all that you reasonably can to manage the risks of a person contracting and/or spreading COVID-19 in your workplace. Depending on the circumstances, you may need to implement control measures in order to meet your OHS duty that go beyond the minimum requirements stated in public health directions or advised by public health authorities. For example, public health directions may state you can have up to 10 customers in your shop at any one time. However, in undertaking your risk assessment you may determine that due to the layout of the workplace and your work processes, having 10 customers in the store would not effectively support physical distancing outcomes. Instead, limiting your store to 8 customers at a time would ensure everyone can maintain a physical distance of 2 metres from each other.


How do I determine which physical distancing measures to implement to minimize the risk of COVID 19 spreading in my workplace?


To determine which physical distancing measures will be most effective in your workplace, you will need to undertake a risk assessment. A risk assessment is part of the risk management process which involves identifying where the risk arises in your workplace, assessing the risks (including the likelihood of them happening), controlling the risks and reviewing these controls regularly. These steps remain the same whether you are conducting a risk assessment in relation to work health and safety generally, or specifically in relation to COVID-19. In order to determine the most effective physical distancing measures you will need to:


  • identify all activities or situations where people in your workplace may be in close proximity to each other

  • assess the level of risk that people in these activities or situations may contract and/or spread COVID-19 in your workplace, and

  • determine what control measures are reasonably practicable to implement based on the assessed level of risk


Remember, you must consult with workers, including volunteers, and their representatives (e.g. health and safety representatives) on health and safety matters relating to COVID-19, including what control measures to put in place in your workplace.


What physical distancing measures do I need to implement in my workplace?


Below are suggested measures to ensure physical distancing is achieved in your industry. Certain activities may not be permissible or there may be specific requirements in your province or state at this time and therefore some of the proposed measures may not be relevant to your workplace. For more information about physical distancing requirements, go to your relevant provincial or state government website.


Remember, you must do all that is reasonably practicable to manage the risk of people contracting and/or spreading COVID-19. Also remember, you must consult with workers and their representatives (e.g. health and safety representatives (HSRs)) on health and safety matters relating to COVID-19, including what control measures to put in place in your workplace.


Worker and student interactions and work tasks


Where possible, provide each person (workers and students) with 4 square metres of space in a room when indoors in accordance with general health advice. To achieve this, calculate the area of the room (length multiplied by width in metres) and divide by 4. This will provide you with the maximum number of people you should have in the space at any one time. Where the nature of work means you are not able to provide 4 square metres of space pers person, you need to implement other measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19.


To help you achieve 4 square metres of space per person (or where not practical, to achieve the maximum space per person) limit the number of people on campus by:


  • facilitating workers, particularly office/administrative workers and those in shared offices, to work from home, where they can

  • continuing to make lectures and tutorials available online where possible and appropriate, to provide alternative options for students, particularly those who may be unwell or in a vulnerable group

  • holding classes, workshops, lectures and tutorials in larger theatres and rooms and monitoring the number of people in the space to ensure compliance with the 4 square metre rule

  • calculating the number of people allowed in rooms and placing signs at the entrance communicating the maximum number of people permitted at one time

  • limiting the number of students that can use labs, animal houses or studios at any one time – e.g. staggering access times

  • reducing the number of lectures/tutorials held each day to allow extra time between classes to minimise interactions between students arriving and leaving rooms

  • implementing separate entrances and exits into lecture theatres and classrooms where possible or staggering entry and exit times

  • advising students to arrive just before their class start time so they can enter the classroom immediately and to leave immediately afterwards to avoid crowding outside rooms and in passageways

  • reducing the number of staff and/or students utilising science or computer labs at any one time by utilising every second computer or work area within the lab

  • implementing electronic or virtual methods for delivering student administrative and support services where possible and appropriate, and

  • postponing non-essential work and activities on campus including sporting and social activities


Direct workers and students to keep 2 metres of distance between them in accordance with general health advice. To achieve the best outcomes for physical distancing:


  • implement measures in combination with measures for 4 square metres spacing, as set out above

  • for outdoor activities ensure the space selected allows for physical distancing of 2 meters

  • where possible ensure seating in theatres, classrooms, workshops and laboratories is spaced out to allow for physical distancing of 2 metres such as only allowing every third seat in theatre style settings to be used and staggering that between rows. Other seats should be clearly marked (e.g. with signage or tape) that they are not to be used

  • put signs around the areas where workers and students normally gather such as outside lecture theatres/classrooms, libraries, study spaces, cafes and dining areas and create wall or floor markings to identify 2 metres distance. University staff could wear a badge as a visual reminder to each other and students of physical distancing requirements

  • limit physical interactions between staff and students, where possible, such as undertaking student consultation electronically instead of students visiting lecturers’ or tutors’ offices

  • minimise the number of people who travel in campus-provided transport at any one time. Refer to our Public Transport guidance for further information, and

  • require staff to use other methods such as mobile phone, radio or teleconference to communicate with each other rather than face to face interaction


Where it is practical and safe to do so, review tasks and processes that usually require close interaction and identify ways to modify these to increase physical distancing between workers and students. Where not possible, reduce the amount of time workers and students spend in close contact.

Where students are required to undertake a clinical placement, vocational placement, or work experience as a component of their studies or training, you must engage with the students and host organisation and assess the risk to these students. Depending on the level of risk, you may need to consider postponing or adjusting the placement and training to ensure health and safety.


Layout of the teaching and common areas


You may need to redesign the layout of the lecture theatres, classrooms, workshops, study rooms and common areas to enable workers and students to keep at least 2 metres apart. This can be achieved by, where possible:


  • restricting workers and students to certain pathways or areas, and

  • removing or spreading out furniture in offices, libraries, study spaces and other common areas to allow for physical distancing. Put signs on walls and tables requiring that furniture not be moved around


Consider floor and/or wall markings and signage to identify 2 metres distancing requirements. If changing the physical layout of the workplace, your layout must allow for workers to enter, exit and move about the workplace both under normal working conditions and in an emergency without risks to their health and safety.


Campus facilities


Reduce the number of workers and students utilising common areas at a given time – e.g. by staggering lecture/tutorial times and meal breaks. Reduce the number of computers available for use in computer labs or libraries at any one time – e.g. by only allowing every second computer to be used. Spread out furniture in common areas. If changing the physical layout of common areas, you must ensure the layout allows for workers and students to enter, exit and move about the campus both under normal working conditions and in an emergency without risks to their health and safety so far as is reasonably practicable. 


Place signage about physical distancing around the campus. Our website has links to a range of posters and resources to help remind workers, students and others of the risks of COVID-19 and the measures that are necessary to stop its spread. Consideration needs to be given to how to communicate with workers and students for who English is not their first language. If you have on campus cafes and dining facilities, ensure they are complying with restrictions and requirements set out by the relevant provincial or state authorities, including physical distancing requirements. See specific information on physical distancing control measures in the Hospitality Industry.


For other campus services such as retail, early childhood education, libraries or fitness facilities ensure they also are complying with restrictions and requirements set out by the relevant provincial or state authorities, including physical distancing requirements. See also our information on Retail, Early Childhood Education, Libraries and Gyms and Fitness Centres.


Staff gatherings and training


Postpone or cancel non-essential gatherings, meetings or training. If gatherings, meetings or training are essential:


  • use non face-to-face options to conduct – e.g. electronic communication such as tele and video conferencing

  • if a non face-to-face option is not possible, ensure face-to-face time is limited, that is make sure the gathering, meeting or training goes for no longer than it needs to

  • hold the gathering, meeting or training it in spaces that enable workers to keep at least 2 metres apart and with 4 square metres of space per person – e.g. outdoors or in large conference rooms

  • limit the number of attendees in a gathering, meeting or training according to physical distancing requirements. This may require, for example, multiple training sessions to be held, and

  • ensure adequate ventilation if held indoors


Deliveries, contractors and visitors attending the campus


Non-essential visits to the workplace should be cancelled or postponed. Minimize the number of workers attending to deliveries and contractors as much as possible. Delivery drivers and other contractors who need to attend the workplace, to provide maintenance or repair services or perform other essential activities, should be given clear instructions of your requirements while they are on site. Ensure handwashing facilities, or if not possible, alcohol-based hand sanitiser, is readily available for workers after physically handling deliveries.


Direct visiting delivery drivers and contractors to remain in vehicles and use contactless methods such as mobile phones to communicate with your workers wherever possible. Direct visiting delivery drivers and contractors to use alcohol-based hand sanitiser before handling products being delivered. Use, and ask delivery drivers and contractors to use, electronic paper work where possible, to minimise physical interaction. Where possible, set up alternatives to requiring signatures. For instance, see whether a confirmation email or a photo of the loaded or unloaded goods can be accepted as proof of delivery or collection (as applicable). If a pen or other utensil is required for signature you can ask that the pen or utensil is cleaned or sanitised before use. For pens, you may wish to use your own.


On-going review and monitoring


If physical distancing measures introduce new health and safety risks (e.g. because they impact communication or mean that less people are doing a task), you need to manage those risks too. Put processes in place to regularly monitor and review the implementation of physical distancing measures to ensure they are being followed and remain effective.


Resources and support


For more information on how we can help, select CONTACT US below or call toll free on 866 337 4734 to arrange an appointment with one of our experienced team members today.


Mental Health

There are current public health directions restricting business operations in some jurisdictions both in Canada and the United States. If you want to know what restrictions on business operations apply to your workplace, go to your relevant provincial or state government website. Businesses must only operate to the extent permissible in each province or state. The information provided below outlines measures which cover all aspects of services offered by the industry – depending on what is permissible in your jurisdiction, some sections may not be currently relevant to your business. 

 

If you want to know how OHS legislation apply to you or need help with what to do at your workplace, contact us on 1 866 337 4734 or through our online contact form.

OHS legislation cover risks to psychological (mental) health too. This is a stressful time for everyone, and you must do what is reasonably practicable to eliminate and reduce the psychological risks to workers and others at the workplace.


Under OHS laws, you must eliminate or minimize the risk to psychological health and safety arising from the work carried out by your business as much as you reasonably can. To determine what measures to put in place, you should carry out a risk assessment and consider all the risks to psychological health in your workplace. You must also consult your workers and their representatives. Workers often know what the issues are and have ideas about how to manage them.


Once you have consulted workers, determined appropriate measures and put them in place, continue to review how you are managing the risks to check your measures are working. This is an unprecedented time for all employers and workers. You may wish to seek professional advice on your OHS duties and how to meet them in your particular circumstances. The OHS regulator in your province or state may also be able to provide further advice.


What causes psychological injury? What are psychosocial hazards?


A psychosocial hazard is anything in the design or management of work that causes stress. Stress is the physical, mental and emotional reaction a person has when we perceive the demands of their work exceed their ability or resources to cope. Work-related stress if prolonged or severe can cause both psychological and physical injury. Stress itself is not an injury. For many people, the COVID-19 pandemic has introduced and increased a range of psychosocial hazards in the workplace, at a time when a range of other non-work related psychosocial risks are also occurring (uncertainty about future employment, social isolation etc.). Psychosocial hazards arising from COVID-19 include:


Exposure to physical hazards and poor environmental conditions


  • concern about exposure to COVID-19 at work

  • poor management of OHS risks, lack of equipment and resources, such as insufficient appropriate PPE

  • exposure to poor conditions such as heat, cold or noise in temporary workplaces


Exposure to violence, aggression, traumatic events and discrimination


  • increased work-related violence, aggression and incivility from patients, customers and members of the public

  • serious illness or death of colleagues or clients e.g. nursing home deaths due to COVID-19

  • racism, discrimination or stigma stemming from COVID-19

  • self-isolation as a result of suspected workplace exposure


Increased work demand


  • increased workloads e.g. supermarket home delivery drivers doing more deliveries and longer hours

  • increased time at work e.g. additional shifts as production moves 24/7 to meet increased demands

  • increased workload e.g. because of increased cleaning requirements or reduction of workers in workplace due to physical distancing requirements

  • work required to adjust to rapid change e.g. buying new equipment or setting up new procedures


Low support and isolated work


  • working from home or isolation from others due to physical distancing or isolation requirements results in feelings of not being supported

  • reduction in number of workers at workplace completing physical tasks to maintain physical distancing requirements

  • failure (perceived or real) of employers not implementing new policies and procedure to address new working arrangements


Poor workplace relationships


  • increased risk of workplace bullying, aggression and harassment as pandemic continues

  • workplace racism, discrimination, or stigma, including towards those that have had COVID-19 or are perceived to be a greater risk to others

  • deterioration of workplace relationships as competing demands lead to less regular and effective two-way communication

  • decreased opportunity for workplace social connections and interactions


Poor organisational change management


  • lack of planning as a result of the pace of the pandemic

  • continual restructures to address the effects of COVID-19 and a corresponding failure to provide information and training, consulting and communicating with or supporting workers (eg. manufacturing companies making different products or redeploying staff to meet changes in demand)

  • insufficient consideration of the potential OHS and performance impacts due to COVID-19


Increased emotional distress


  • limitations on workers offering the same assistance to colleagues or clients they normally would or witnessing others’ distress in situations where they can’t access their normal services or support eg. a cancer ward in a hospital has restricted visitors to reduce the risk to patients. The nurses see their patients and family struggle with this isolation.


How can I eliminate and manage risks to psychological health?


You should manage psychosocial risks in the same way as physical risks. Eliminating or minimizing physical risks will also help to manage many psychosocial risks. See also our section about conducting Risk Assessments for COVID-19.


Tips for managing stress from COVID-19


  • regularly ask your workers how they are going and if anything is stressing them

  • where workers are distressed about the challenging conditions caused by the pandemic, acknowledge their feelings about the situation and reassure workers they are doing what they can in the circumstances  stay informed with information from official sources and regularly communicate or share this information with workers

  • consult your workers and representatives on any risks to their psychological health and physical health and safety

  • support innovations to address the psychosocial risks where you reasonably can

  • provide workers with a point of contact to discuss their concerns

  • make workplace information available in a central place

  • inform workers about their entitlements if they become unfit for work or have caring responsibilities

  • inform workers about their rights under OHS legislation, including the right to stop work in certain circumstances and the right not to be discriminated against or disadvantaged for raising work health and safety concerns in the workplace

  • proactively support workers who you identify to be more at risk of workplace psychological injury (e.g. frontline workers or those working from home), and

  • refer workers to appropriate work related mental health and wellbeing support services (such as employee assistance programs)


Non work-related causes of stress


There are things that may stress your workers during the COVID-19 pandemic which may not be work related. Even though you may not have legal obligations in relation to that stress, you should take this into account, and if you are able to, offer workers increased support and flexibility